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Lights, Camera, Cybersecurity: What You Need to Know About the MoviePass Breach

If you’re a frequent moviegoer, there’s a chance you may have used or are still using movie ticket subscription service and mobile app MoviePass. The service is designed to let film fanatics attend a variety of movies for a convenient price, however, it has now made data convenient for cybercriminals to potentially get ahold of. According to TechCrunch, the exposed database contained 161 million records, with many of those records including sensitive user information.


So, what exactly do these records include? The exposed user data includes 58,000 personal credit cards and customer card numbers, which are similar to normal debit cards. They are issued by Mastercard and store a cash balance that users can use to pay so they can watch a catalog of movies. In addition to the MoviePass customer cards and financial information numbers, other exposed data includes billing addresses, names, and email addresses. TechCrunch reported that a combination of this data could very well be enough information to make fraudulent purchases.


The database also contained what researchers presumed to be hundreds of incorrectly typed passwords with user email addresses. With this data, TechCrunch attempted to log into the database using a fake email and password combination. Not only did they immediately gain access to the MoviePass account, but they found that the fake login credentials were then added to the database.


Since then, TechCrunch reached out to MoviePass and the company has since taken the database offline. However, with this personal and financial information publicly accessible for quite some time, users must do everything in their power to safeguard their data. Here are some tips to help keep your sensitive information secure:

  • Review your accounts. Be sure to look over your credit card and banking statements and report any suspicious activity as soon as possible.

  • Place a fraud alert. If you suspect that your data might have been compromised, place a fraud alert on your credit. This not only ensures that any new or recent requests undergo scrutiny, but also allows you to have extra copies of your credit report so you can check for suspicious activity.

  • Consider using identity theft protection. There are several third party identify theft protection solutions that can help you monitor your accounts and alert you of any suspicious activity. You should look for one that includes dark web scanning to see if your information is being brokered.

Follow me on Twitter @GaryJDavis for breaking security and privacy news.

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© 2019 by Gary J. Davis.